A Little Poem to explain why Spell-Check is not all it’s cracked up to be….26-02-2014 | 10:10:32 | 1 Comment

 

 

Poet Tree Without Mist Aches 

Eye have a spelling chequer
It came with my pea sea
It plainly marques four my revue
Miss steaks eye can knot sea.

Eye strike a quay and right a word
And weight four it two say
Weather eye am wrong oar write
It shows me strait a weigh.

As soon as a mist ache is maid
It nose bee fore two late
And eye can put the error rite
Its rare lea ever grate.

I’ve  run this poem threw it
I’m  shore your pleased two no
It’s letter perfect in its weigh
My chequer tolled me sew.

HOMOPHONES:   Words that are pronounced alike but differ in meaning.

Now see if you can write a little poem or story of your own.  Spell check would think it is correct but it would give an English teacher nightmares!

Here’s my attempt:

Once upon a thyme their was a young buoy who was full off sir prizes.  He went two It alley on a crews and sailed for own lea won day butt the ship did knot arrive they’re bee cause it went off coarse.  Next weak he will travel by plain inn stead.

My Grandparents’ House by Yasmin24-02-2014 | 10:14:11 | 4 Comments

The smell of watermelon flows in the air with a scent of candy floss and the saltiness of the sea. The market men shout, “One pound hats and swimsuits!”  They also sell fruits.

The villas sweat from the heat and the clothes from the washing line melt.  The sea is clear and there is soft, smooth sand if you go a bit deeper in the sea.  The fish might bite but it tickles.  The sea sends angry hellos and water trickles down rocks creating a beautiful waterfall.  The sand is burning hot like fire to your feet.

The swimming pools are amazing.  When you get out of the house there is a swimming pool and others around the area too.  The best thing about them is the red tongues.  You go down them in a ring or on a mat and then you slide down, splash quickly then get out of the pool or the lifeguard will shout.  These are the water slides.

It is the complete opposite to London.  That is what’s great about Turkey.

Enter a short story competition20-02-2014 | 14:04:26 | 1 Comment

I’ve only just heard of this – but there is still time to enter!  The deadline for entries is next Wednesday 26th February.

BBC Radio 2 is running a 500 word short story competition for children.  Here is the website:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p00rfvk1

Have a go!  Feel free to email me with your drafts for comments, or just enter.  You are a creative bunch and have such good ideas for stories.    There are videos and ideas on the site to help you get started and plenty of stories  there, as examples, to read too.  And 500 words isn’t too much to write, even at half term.  Most of the compositions you have done for me are about that length.  Good luck!  Mrs W

Half term Challenge15-02-2014 | 18:37:34 | 20 Comments

Here’s a half-term challenge for you.

Make up a brand new tongue-twister.  Think of tongue-twisters that you know already.  “Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled pepper..”  and “Red Lorry, Yellow Lorry” spring to mind.  Peter Piper’  uses alliteration (you all know what that is!).  Others, such as ‘Red Lorry’ are simply phrases that include sounds that are very difficult to say clearly when repeated  because the sounds are similar, but different enough to make your tongue have to work very hard.  Some use  rhyme to make saying the expression even more difficult.  They always make some sort of sense, however nonsensical!

 

My attempt:

Spam flan or ham flan?

(for those of you who don’t know, Spam was a horrible type of tinned meat that used to be a regular school dinner choice in my day)

Punctuation Nightmares!11-02-2014 | 17:35:54 | 8 Comments

If you are the first person to post a reply and spot all the punctuation problems in these pictures, there might be a little something for you…. as well as lots of glory.

punctuation1punctuation2punctuation

Hint:  There are 8 mistakes in total.  Correct spelling please.

My Islington by Skylar11-02-2014 | 13:01:19 | 6 Comments

Islington Angel. That’s my area. I don’t know why my parents wanted to live there but I love it. Every morning there is a clear blue sky with big white clouds. There are brown and white blocks surrounding a lot of greenery. To me the trees look like big broccoli and the houses look like white chocolate and milk chocolate with hard sweets as the windows and the pavement looks a big grey chocolate wrapper.  The blue sky is blue and white candyfloss.

Along my road all the houses are bunched together. They look like a pattern waiting to be painted. Along every road there are houses, from colour to colour and shape to shape. I think all the roads have a particular shape with their own design. Trees surround all the houses with their big branches. The dogs play in the park, chasing the ball with the other dogs and people run around the block listening to music. The overground train moves off with ten more passengers getting on and six getting off, with the minimum of three waiting for the next one. I live near a prison call Her Majesty’s Prison Pentonville but for short HMP Pentonville.

I love my house. It really is the best in my neighbourhood. I’ll tell you why; it has a face. All the other houses don’t have faces; they’re all just… well normal and that isn’t much fun.   That is why my family and I are really lucky to have this particular house. Another reason why I love my house so much is because I feel like my family was meant to live there. My house is one of those houses that has an owner who is a neat freak, but it is still a humble and welcoming home. My home comes alive at night; well that is what I think.

My Primrose Hill by Lola11-02-2014 | 12:52:37 | 3 Comments

Primrose Hill – it’s obvious why it got its name because of the giant park that takes up miles and miles of space.  The people like little black dots bob up and down.  It is one of the nicest parks to take a dog for a walk. I can hear the sound of barking across the road, dogs talking to each other. Big blocks of brightly coloured houses line the streets. Great big bushy trees that never, ever get a cut, take up half of the path so people go one by one down the road that is always busy. Then there is the great big dirty canal with bridges with people walking back and forth.

When anyone says the “village” it’s confusing because there is not an actual village any more, but no in Primrose Hill, if you turn the a corner you’ll sneak into another world, loud and noisy with laughter and chattering, everyone knowing each other and saying hello to passers-by.

When you first enter the village there are some houses, a clothes shop and then a pet shop where you can hand over your black dog to them and it comes back to you gleaming white! Nowhere is as beautiful as the place I live, in Primrose Hill.

My Highbury and Islington by Eve11-02-2014 | 08:55:22 | 5 Comments

Highbury and Islington has almost everything.  Over to left is the train station and the roundabout.  To the right is a large park,  this is Highbury Fields.  One side curves and the other side is straight like a tortoise shell.  A swimming pool sits in the park on the straight side.

The cars move around the roundabout like cogs in a clock.  People swarm out of the train station like wasps from a nest. Over towards the swimming pool is an ice cream van, pink like candy floss. The doors on the road  are all different colours like paint on a shelf.

One door stands out, a big yellow door, number eight.  The door is as yellow as a rubber duck. Two young children walk past as happy as hyenas, they must have got an ice cream from Tina.  She’s the lovely lady who runs the ice cream van . Another girl comes to the door beaming like a manta ray.  She walks up the mountain of stairs to the yellow door.  She turns, waiting for her parents. This girl is me, and I am in my Highbury and Islington.

My Hampstead Heath by Maja11-02-2014 | 08:53:27 | 6 Comments

Hampstead for me is the Heath, where I have been going to since I was really little. The main part of the Heath, for me is Kenwood House and all of its land. Every weekend we go there. It has a lot of land. Kenwood House (in fact it’s a mansion) is magnificent. The main house is white with plastered decoration in the shape of leaves. It has two side buildings attached to it, the Orangery with enormous French doors and the library.

Surrounding Kenwood house are huge trees and two ponds that connect to each other. I like the trees best in winter when the snow is on the branches, it looks magical. In autumn the trees are different colours: burgundy, green and red. In winter the lake is ice solid and there are hardly any signs of life.

Kenwood is full of trees but my favourite tree is a climbing tree. It is quite low and its branches spread out like someone’s long, matted hair when they have just woken up. I climb it every time we go. I fell once but I still go back because from half way up I can see the pond and the green. That is why I love Hampstead Heath.

My Islington by Daisy06-02-2014 | 08:58:46 | 4 Comments

The colours gleam from high above.  The noise bursts your ears as people shout, “Come and buy the lovely poppies and daisies.  Only five pounds each!” The sea of tarmac is covered by tiny little dots holding bags full of flowers. The bright, coloured tops of the stalls make your eyes water.

The big church gleams like a halo. The glass painted windows tell the story of Jesus. The choir is so loud and beautiful that your attention gets drawn inside. The wedding vows and laughter make you cry. The three bells give you a headache.

The 123 chimneys on top of the houses are shaped like cylinders. The murky green blanket of grass covers up the old river. The road was once called The River Walk until it was finally covered up. The massive mansions and flats make tourists gaze jealously. And then there is my house; the light blue door, the big windows and the strange explosions coming from my father’s office as he tests his ethanol rockets!  But I shout, “Bye Mum, Dad!   I am off to school now!”

My Manor Gardens by Ella06-02-2014 | 08:57:42 | 5 Comments

Manor Gardens is a place with lots of sound like the children’s harmony coming from the school next door and I like listening to the dogs having a conversation.  The pavement is like a Dalmatian with white spots of chewing gum stuck onto the slabs.

I can hear the cars which roar like lions at each other.  The grass of the park is like a green carpet. The stack of bricks that are piled on top of each other make buildings like dull Lego.

Black gates, like long sticks of liquorice stand in front of a pool of white stones, as if they could be dipped in the sherbet pool.  These stand in front of my home.

My Islington by Honey04-02-2014 | 12:26:20 | 6 Comments

Holloway Road and Seven Sisters Street are the home to multi-coloured snails and tiny ants which are the cars and people in every sort of colour you could possibly think of. Matchbox houses and shops form the main road and small side roads. Each house and shop is a different colour, which adds to the interest of the roads. Highbury Fields is a dab of green compared to the grey and black of tarmac streets. A small brown splodge, the café. The playground, a child’s heaven of fun and play. Next comes the Emirates stadium. On a match day the place is a  whirl of red paint with a few different colours to add to the interest of the tornado. The few colours that are there are soon swallowed by the red tornado of Arsenal supporters.

A red sea, with a few fish that swim around but never really belong. Then in the center of the red sea there is a green patch like seaweed.  But before you can have a good look a roar emits for what must be Arsenal. Then a small cheer for the away team. The game begins. Sometimes if the wind is blowing from the stadium to wherever you are, you can hear the commentary. Nearly always you can hear the roars for the goals. The roars that soon die down are the near goals.

The players are streaking down the pitch. They seem to be doing a strange dance with the ball. But the dance is interrupted by the defending team! The teams soon swap roles; the new defending team are trying to stop the strange dance, but the attacking team have scored! The red players are cheering, celebrating because they have scored not the away team. But before long the dance starts again and the away team score!  Nooo!!! Our players are now trying harder than ever. Two minutes to go. We have the ball, our players are coming closer and closer to the goal. They have scored and the whistle blows. We have won!  A mighty lion roars,” We have won!”

My Tufnell Park by Emilia04-02-2014 | 08:39:08 | 11 Comments

Tufnell Park. It is not a park, so I do not know why it is called Tufnell Park. There is a big hill with little ants scurrying up and down it. There is a peculiar shaped building at the bottom of the hill that swallows up the ants in humungous gulps! Multi-coloured snails tread up the hill every day, one after the other, turning off the hill in random directions.

Candy-coloured houses are attached like links on chains. Red and brown bricked roofs look like the autumn leaves on the floor. There is a burst of green in the gardens, with eccentric plants and flowers that are like the Great Barrier Reef! The windows are always filled with life and light!

The sky-blue door of my house is the only one that stands out on my street to me. Outside, there is the sweet-smelling of the bush in my front garden. I can hear the fire crackling in my house, in front of my sofa where I snuggle up with my family…

My Highbury and Islington by Caterina04-02-2014 | 08:26:54 | 4 Comments

If you sit on a cloud above Highbury and Islington, Highbury Fields look like an island surrounded by a sea of roads.  It’s as if the cars, houses and people are tiny little schools of fish. Big trucks behave like sharks, pushing and eating the small fish. The park is like a cruise ship anchored onto the island.

Now if you jump off the cloud, and go to the park, as you walk through the gate you will notice that on your left there is a small clearing.

If you walk into the middle of the clearing you will notice that, apart from the two entrances, it is surrounded by a thick layer of trees and bushes. If you go to the only bush with berries on it you will see that the tree closest to you will have a highly disguised log placed carefully, safely and stably in-between two branches, where I often like to sit and watch the world go by.

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